Monday, October 28, 2013

READ THE PLAQUE


There is a park near my apartment to commemorate Sir John Sparrow(???!) David Thomspon. You know, the former Prime Minister. Yes, on a little, residential street. It is a few meters of grass behind a store that sells wood chippers, chain saws, and bubble gum, so I think we can all forgive ourselves for not noticing. Except we can't, because there is a plaque.

Nova Scotia is a province of plaques. I have seen plaques for spots where the Queen has stopped to admire the view, plaques for where beer was brewed, plaques for where important works of literature were written, and plaques for where people have gotten the crap kicked out of them in bar fights.

Started by 99 percent invisible & The Atlantic, READ THE PLAQUE was not a project created with Nova Scotia in mind, but it should have been. Let's be super nerdy in the best possible way and honour the drinkers, fighters, lovers, etc. who made our hometowns great by submitting photos of local plaques. Seriously, if there's one thing my province excels at, it's putting weird words on weird metal to commemorate the weirdest people ever. To all the non Scotians: I'd love to see if your immortal beer tales could rival ours. (Doubt it.)

» Put your plaque on the map.
» Hear the funny story that started the project.
» I've submitted a few from our neighbourhood and Cleveland that I hope will be on the website soon. I've decided I will find the 5 best bronze Halifax history hotspots and will have them sent in by next Sunday. I'd be happy for your suggestions, as well as nearby places to eat, because that's one of my favourite parts of any adventure.

Finally: name your kids Sparrow because that's awesome.

2 comments:

Rebecca Jane said...

PEI has numerous plaques as well, I'll have to do my part and participate in this little project!

Kelly-Ann Maddox said...

I forgot how much I love your blog. I've returned to it time and again, whether I was keeping my own blog up-to-date or not, just to sit for a while on an island of sanity. :) I love the plaques on park benches in England, dedicated to local people who've died. It seems more poignant to rest my behind on one of them somehow.

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